INJURY PEST, AGE AND DOUBLE-HANDED BACKHAND

Just found an interesting short article, including interview with Roger Federer, concerning the injury pest continuing from 2017.

You can find the article here: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis/australian-open-2018-injuries-to-ageing-mens-stars-a-normal-thing-says-roger-federer-20180102-h0ce9r.html


One thing is obvious – it’s ageing of  the quite numerous members of the TOP20 players. 9 of them are 30+,  4 are close to 30. Some years ago just time to retire..

It’s not the same to catch an injury (needing longer rehab or surgery) at 20-25 years of age and at 30+.

Another obvious thing is power-game without perfect skills, with bad body proportions (tall and heavy but not being server-only-player like Isner or Karlovic – an example here is Raonic.

But what most would never think – according to Federer (and I agree completely, also from my humble amateur experience at 50+ and now 60+) one of important reasons of injuries (first of all the wrist, but also the upperbody, ) is playing double-handed backhand. The worst example is here Delpo with 3 wrist surgeries  (left hand, so the one needed only for double-handed backhand) or Nadal (right hand, because he’s lefty).

Double-handed backhand is in every aspect unnatural. So why do so many use it? Because it’s easier to learn and gives extra stability for backhand shots. But on cost of health.

I don’t know exactly, where does Murray’s hip injury from, but I can imagine it coming just from DHB. If you don’t play tennis yourself, you can easily observe watching matches, what happens with the upperbody when hitting DHB. SHB is just the opposite and while it makes harder to learn and to find the right timing. your wrists and upperbody will thank you for playing it and reward you with extra flexibility and capability of changing the shot direction in the last moment of the hitting movement, so you are likely to deliver lots of surprises to your opponent.

Fortunately we can see single-handed backhand coming back in young  players, like Thiem, Shapovalov, Tsitsipas, to name only those from Top100.

They are following big oldschool single-handers with certain Roger Federer still on the top at 36+.

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